Construction Career Spotlight On:

Welder

From the cars we drive to the houses we live in, the welding industry is constantly shaping our world. Skilled welding professionals keep our industries and economy moving forward each and every day and work behind the scenes from constructing bridges to Hollywood movie sets. Welding offers multiple career paths and is consistently in high demand.

Average Salary*

Avg. Hourly Wage*

Pros In Demand

*Plus overtime and bonuses!

The Life of a Welder

Welders play a pivotal role in the construction and design processes. That’s why being a welder requires a fusion of technical skills, imaginative thinking, and meticulous precision. A welder’s responsibilities include measuring and marking, guaranteeing accurate weld alignments, and applying finishes to improve the strength and aesthetics of their fabricated structures.

You might love a career in welding if you enjoy…

  • Creative Problem-Solving 95% 95%
  • Working with Tools 90% 90%
  • Detail-Oriented Tasks 90% 90%
  • Math & Numbers 85% 85%
  • Being Active 80% 80%

Becoming a Welder

There are multiple pathways to becoming a professional welder. Check out the options below and click the buttons to discover the opportunities.

Choose Your Path

Technical Training
Pathway 1
Straight to Workforce
Pathway 2
Apprenticeships
Pathway 3
Students working with instructor at a technical training progam

A training program prepares students with skills for careers in the welding industry and emphasizes a combination of welding theory and practical applications necessary for successful employment.

Students completing a welding training program obtain the qualifications for an entry–level residential welder or entry–level commercial welder.

Standard training programs include:

Smiling welder ready for work

Although most welders are educated in their trade through a degree program or apprenticeship, some learn welding skills on the job and start as a helper or apprentice.

Workers typically learn the proper use of hand and power tools on the job. They often start by working with more experienced welders and are given more complex tasks as they prove that they can handle simpler tasks, such as measuring and cutting wooden and metal studs.

Welders working on construction site

Although most welders are educated in their trade through a degree program or apprenticeship, some learn welding skills on the job and start as a helper or apprentice.

Workers typically learn the proper use of hand and power tools on the job. They often start by working with more experienced welders and are given more complex tasks as they prove that they can handle simpler tasks, such as measuring and cutting wooden and metal studs.

Welding Specializations

As a welder, you can specialize in different types of projects depending on your interest and experience.

Welders

Work in a wide variety of industries, from car racing to manufacturing. The work that welders do and the equipment they use vary with the industry. Arc welding, the most common type of welding today, uses electrical currents to create heat and bond metals together—but there are more than 100 different processes that a welder can use. The type of weld normally is determined by the types of metals being joined and the conditions under which the welding is to take place.

Cutters

Use heat to cut and trim metal objects to specific dimensions. The work of arc, plasma, and oxy–gas cutters is closely related to that of welders. However, instead of joining metals, cutters use the heat from an electric arc, a stream of ionized gas called plasma, or burning gases to cut and trim metal objects to specific dimensions. Cutters also dismantle large objects, such as ships, railroad cars, automobiles, buildings, and aircraft. Some operate and monitor cutting machines similar to those used by welding machine operators.

Solderers & Brazers

Use heat to join two or more metal objects together. Soldering commonly is used to make electrical and electronic circuit boards, such as computer chips. Soldering workers tend to work with small pieces that must be positioned precisely. Brazing often is used to connect cast iron and thinner metals that the higher temperatures of welding would warp. Brazing also can be used to apply coatings to parts in order to reduce wear and protect against corrosion.

Find Welding Jobs

Check out our directory to find welding jobs in your area and around the country.

Videos: Life in Welding

What is the life of a welder really like? Find out from experts, recent hires, and our pro videos.

Cupcake Day

Cupcake Day

A bright high school senior casts aside a table of “cupcake” college offers in favor of pursuing a future in the skilled trades
TCSG: We Are the Students of Technical College

TCSG: We Are the Students of Technical College

Produced in partnership with the Technical College System of Georgia, this montage highlights the unique educational experiences and benefits offered at Georgia’s 22 technical colleges.
Jenn the Builder – Entrepreneur

Jenn the Builder – Entrepreneur

“Jenn the Builder” Metzger shares her personal story of owning a residential construction business, along with the challenges and opportunities she encountered on her road to success.

Welding Careers News and Tools

Check out our articles, guides and downloadable resources to help you get started on the road to a career in welding.

News

Resources

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